My Square Foot Garden: Week 3

Cucumber emerges

Week 3: A baby cucumber makes its debut. 

When I last wrote about my new square foot garden, I left you with something of a cliffhanger: What shape would the garden be in after spending two weeks away in Italy?

The good news is that when we returned home last week, everything I planted was still alive. Thanks to my neighbor, who kept each of the boxes watered, the plants had not only survived, but were actually growing. And, the seeds which I had planted for radishes, beets, chard, arugula, and frisee had actually sprouted while I was gone. The only sign of neglect were the basil plants, which beefier, but now sporting white flowers. I pinched those off (according to everything I've read about what you're supposed to do with basil).

The Garden: Week 3

Here's a blow-by-blow update, box-by-box (and row by row, left to right):

Box #1
· The Cherokee tomato plant are looking good as the vine makes its way up the stake.
· Sweet 100 cherry tomato plant is also coming along nicely.
· The cucumber plants are growing very fast, extending thin tendrils to climb even higher. Small, embryonic cukes are visible!
· That malabar spinach, too tall for this spot, is out. In went seeds to grow red chard. Little red sprouts are visible.
· Basil is looking taller and bushier.
· It's status quo for the orange pepper plant. Not too much new going on (on the other hand, it's still alive).
· Arugula seeds have also sprouted.
· Leaves of frisee have emerged from the seeds I planted before the trip
· Greek oregano is spreading. In retrospect, this seems like a waste of space. I'm inclined to pull it out and replant with something else. Any recipe ideas for using up the oregano?

Box #2
· Vintage wine tomatoes are growing.
· Brandywine vine has continued to grow.
· Hillbilly tomato plant, the tallest, is nearing the top of the stake. It must have almost doubled in size.
· The finger eggplant continues to grow.
· The rosemary is taller.
· Italian large leaf basil is growing.
· The spicy/globe basil is really doing well.
· The beets I planted have sprouted.
· Leafy radish greens have popped out where I planted French breakfast radishes. They should be ready to pick this week.

Stay tuned for more updates, or follow along as I post photos of the garden's progress on flickr.

 

The Food Section's Square Foot Garden photoset The Food Section's Square Foot Garden photoset

 





Comments

I was fine until I read about your nefarious plans for that poor oregano. Please - oh please - don't murder it. Just move the innocent thing to some quiet corner of the yard where it can be allowed to live its life in peace. It will reward you with, um, well, oregano. It's a perennial so it should never have been planted in your square garden in the first place. I didn't want to say anything...

 

Italian parsley. You can never have enough. We have a thousand-square-foot garden and at least a dozen plants. The flavor is so awesome, so much better than store bought.

 

You will love your square foot garden. My wife and I just built three 4x8 boxes...now filled with heirloom tomatoes and herbs. We visit our new garden every day and love everything about it...well, except the mosquitoes. Have fun!

 

You will love your square foot garden. My wife and I just built three 4x8 boxes...now filled with heirloom tomatoes and herbs. We visit our new garden every day and love everything about it...well, except the mosquitoes. Have fun!

 

Evelyn: Now I feel guilty! You got me. I will find a new home for the oregano.

 

Thank you. I'll sleep better tonight. And so will you. And that goes double for the oregano.

 

Please, tell me, what's your secret for keeping your basil intact? I have seven basil plants and not one is producing edible leaves. Edible for humans, that is. The slugs and bugs are sick for my basil. I don't use pesticides - other than a chili-garlic spray that is apparently functioning as salad dressing. Any suggestions?

 

Ok, there are a few holes in some of the leaves (they're not perfect). But, luckily, we have no slugs or snails at all. I've never seen one (maybe it's a Northeast thing since they were very common in Northern California). I know there are also soap-based sprays, but not sure if that will really help . . .

 

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